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Juvenile Arthritis – Not Just Your Grandparents’ Disease

Arthritis

We’re accustomed to joint problems increasing as we age into our wisest selves but there is a small population that experiences this at a young age. Juvenile arthritis (JA) is an umbrella term for several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that can affect children.

 

There are 7 different types of juvenile arthritis:

Almost 300,000 children in the United States have some form of juvenile arthritis and 50,000 of those suffer from the most common, juvenile idiopathic arthritis. These diseases present themselves in children as young as 6 months old. Some children may have no symptoms at all and symptoms can vary depending on which type of disease they have.

Some of the more common symptoms include:

Unfortunately, diagnosing for juvenile arthritis can be difficult. There are no specific tests for JA but doctors can use tests to eliminate other options or even help determine which type of arthritis the child may have. A careful physical exam and a thorough medical history will help with determining a diagnosis. As with most diseases, early identification and treatment are important to deterring future complications.

Cause and Treatment

The cause of juvenile arthritis is still unknown. It is possible that genetics could cause a predisposition for the disease. There is no data to suggest that it could be caused by toxins, foods, or an allergy. There’s no known cure for juvenile arthritis but treatments can help lessen symptoms. Some goals for treatments include reducing swelling and pain, preventing joint damage, and improving joint mobility and strength. There are a variety of options for medication, including IVIg. While it may seem counterintuitive, exercise is actually a vital part of treatment. Diet is another component of maintaining proper nutrition is important to a child’s natural development and to encourage an active lifestyle. Children with juvenile arthritis are still able to lead active lives along with their friends and family. With the care of a trained physician, families can work together to improve a child’s chance of maintaining an improved quality of life, maybe even gaining remission.

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